Found in Translation: new book

“Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World”, by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche. I’ve just pre-ordered this book from Amazon.

Book description:

Found in Translation reveals how translation affects virtually every aspect of life, by shining a light on translation and interpreting in some fun and unexpected places. From politics to food, from love to religion, the book is a light-hearted look at the role of translation in everyday life.

Jost Zetzsche writes “The Tool Box Newsletter: A computer newsletter for translation professionals”. In his latest edition, he writes about how excited he is to have his “labor of love” being published this year:

Never did I have that feeling of wanting to say something as strongly as I did last week, when Nataly Kelly’s and my labor of love — Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World — was listed at Amazon (including all the .co.uk, .de, .ca, and .co.jp editions of Amazon) for preorder. In my Twitter announcement of the book I said that this is going to be the year of translators and interpreters, and I think it just might be. Nataly and I are planning amazing things to promote the book and, more importantly, our professions (= you). You’ll hear much more about this in the next few months.

Oh, and the book? You’ll hear more about that as well, but here it is in super-condensed form: A collection of about 90 engaging stories about how translation and interpretation affect everything. Everything. From business to human rights to security to sex. Obviously you’ll love it – you’re a language professional, after all, and you’ll recognize your own efforts in some of the stories. But more importantly, the folks around you who are not in the language industry (family, friends, potential clients . . .) will eat it up because they will suddenly see the world with completely new eyes (and in the process finally understand what you actually do).

The release date is October 2, 2012–a good read to look forward to in the fall. 🙂

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